Posts tagged Pinterest

Make the Most of Pinterest

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This infographic from Edelman Digital really sums things up nicely. Take a look–is there more you can do to increase your effectiveness?

Social Check-Up

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laptop and stethoscope

The Consumerist points out that 13 million people have left the default Facebook privacy settings in place. Don’t be one of them.

Karlyn Borysenko of HoneyB Social Media & Digital Communications writes about deciding if Pinterest is a good fit for your brand. She makes a point that I think a lot of people forget: it’s okay to try something and then stop if it doesn’t work. If your core audience isn’t on a particular channel, it’s okay to stop using it. But if they are, well, aren’t you glad you tried? Keep on keepin’ on.

Mashable reports that 49% of marketers have not made social media part of their larger strategies. Don’t be one of them, either.

Photo by jfcherry, via Flickr.

As Long As Your Money’s Green . . .

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Money - Savings

. . . does it matter how many X chromosomes you have?

Pinterest is a hot topic, and one of the most newsworthy points is that 97 percent of Pinterest’s Facebook fans are women. So it’s easy for some people to dismiss it.

But Pinterest drives huge amounts of traffic to other sites, and that ultimately means sales. Who buys things? Women. In fact, girltalk points out that women make or influence 85 percent of all purchasing decisions, including over 50 percent of cars, home improvement items, electronics, and other “guy” products.

At the same time, girltalk reports, “91% of women say that advertisers don’t understand them.”

So if women make up just over half the population, and the majority of purchases, what does that say about how good a job advertisers are doing at reaching them?

My advice: Get to know us. Look at who women are, and what they want, and what they do. And don’t dismiss those things because “they’re women.” If you want money, you’re going to have to ask us. Nicely. Because we’re the ones who decide how it gets spent. And as Michael Brito points out, we know how to share information. Make sure we have good information to share about you.

Photo by 401k, via Flickr.

Ask Better Questions to Accomplish Organizational Goals

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Tricks are easy. They’re also transient. Good work is hard, and requires serious thought and preparation to succeed. Take a look at these links to see some things you should be thinking about, and extrapolate.

Start of a Horse Race

Are you too focused on “likes”?
Social Business: Far Beyond The Like at Brass Tack Thinking.

Should you be on Pinterest? Well, what do you do?
The 10 Most-Followed Brands on Pinterest at Mashable.

Are you trying to sell when you should be listening?
Why Are Retailers Shutting Their Facebook Stores? at Mashable

So, what questions should you be asking? And are you asking them?

Photo by Rennett Stowe, via Flickr.

Get Pinned!

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Still interested in that Pinterest thing you’ve been hearing so much about? Here are some more places to find ideas about making it work for your brand.

“Pinterest Rivals Twitter in Referral Traffic”
If you’re wondering if there’s a point to all of this, check out Brian Solis’s post about Pinterest’s success in driving traffic and engagement.

“How Brands Can Get Involved on Pinterest”
Social Media Group has a few how-to tips that may come in handy, as well as methods worth exploring.

“Pinterest drives enormous blog and business success”
On {Grow}, Lauren Schaefer provides a case study of Pinterest success, including that careful balance of self-promotion, how-to, and outside ideas that fit the brand.

And a worthy repeat:
“Pinterest for Brands: 5 Hot Tips”
Mashable has some more suggestions: promote a lifestyle, use it like a focus group, crowdsource, run contests, and inspire your team. All of these have potential–but I’m repeating this one for #5, because all too often, that end of the equation is ignored.

That’s Pinterest-ing

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There’s been a lot of talk about Pinterest lately. The online, social equivalent of a corkboard, it’s a way to share images that fascinate, intrigue, or just plain appeal to you. While Pinterest asks that you not just upload and pin a ton of your own stuff, it does seem to me that artists and designers could use it as a source of inspiration.

You “pin” things onto “boards” with topics or themes of your choosing. I’m still building mine, but on a personal level, it’s a fun way to collect and share things with friends (and strangers, depending on your privacy settings).

So how can brands, companies, and organizations use Pinterest?

Some uses seem fairly self-evident; Real Simple uses Pinterest to share ideas from their magazine, as well as from other sources around the web. The look matches their style, particularly since they’ve been in the business of thematic content curation for quite some time, both online and in print.

Travel Channel uses Pinterest to share images from around the world, be they pristine beaches, international street food, or behind-the-scenes shots from some of their programs.

Bergdorf Goodman’s boards focus on seasonal trends, beauty products, and gift ideas, as well as shoes–some of which I find kind of scary, but definitely creative.

The secret seems to be in correctly identifying your philosophy. Pinterest may not be where you share your own content, but it can help you demonstrate where your brand fits in the larger world. Oberlin College’s Ma’ayan Plaut has a great post on the CASE blog that looks at how this can work for colleges and universities–but her thoughts are hardly limited to that sector. (Michael Fienen at DotEdGuru says to hold off, but really he seems to be saying, “Think about how to make it work, first,” which is certainly good advice regardless of tactic.)

So, what do you think–is there room for Pinterest in your strategy?

Social Media Roundup

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roundup

Over the past few days, there’s been a lot of talk about Pinterest for businesses. I’ve been having fun with it, and I definitely see how it could be of use for brands–depending on the brand. Maggie McGary has a post on SocialFish that can help you figure out if it’s right for yours.

How can you make LinkedIn work for your brand? Edelman Digital’s blog features a post by Rachel Levine that explains how some of the site’s new features may be of use to companies and organizations.

Facebook introduces direct messages between pages and fans. If you’re based in Asia, you may be able to put this into action now. If you’re not, take advantage of the time to learn from the successes and missteps of those who are.

And, of course, Google+ now offers pages for brands.

Photo by alandberning, via Flickr.

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