Posts tagged brand

Facebook Timeline and Your Brand

0

Facebook Timeline will become the default for brands on March 30–between now and then, only you can see your page in the new format, so now’s the time to start working on it. You’ll want it to be ready for the public by then (and if you’re ready ahead of time, go ahead and make the switch by publishing your page).

Mashable has a post that identifies six things you should know going forward. I’d particularly like to point out #5, because it’s a reminder to look at all of the ways your brand uses Facebook, not just the Wall. Take a look at your current tabs and app, and figure out what you need to change to make them look current in the new format.

Patrick Powers writes about higher education, but his advice about Timeline is good regardless of your economic sector. Remember that you can now add events that took place before the dawn of Facebook–was your organization founded in 1919? Great–why not list that on your Timeline?

If there’s a post you particularly want to highlight, you can “pin” it to the top of the Timeline; this Techcrunch post shows what that will look like.

Are you ready to get started, but want some inspiration? Check out what how the U.S. military is using Timeline (see above for how the U.S. Army is using its cover photo)–or look at these 20 other examples provided by Mashable.

Facebook Timeline and Your Brand, Part 1

1

Facebook’s Timeline is a dramatic new direction for Profiles. What does it mean for Pages? As with anything, there are opportunities and challenges. Let’s start with the opportunities and move on to the challenges in a future post.

The first question to ask, really, is whether it means anything for Pages. What if Facebook decides to give Pages a different look?

I’d be surprised if they did. After all, the last several Page revisions have been focused on making Pages more like Profiles, not less. But even if Pages do get a different look, there are still a lot of ways in which recent changes can help bring new awareness and energy to your brand’s presence on Facebook.

1) New metrics. Facebook has introduced a “People Talking About” metric. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly, because it doesn’t measure sentiment. But it does measure likes, comments, shares, questions answered, and more.

2) It’s not about the “like.” As Seth Odell* discusses in a recent Higher Ed Live webcast, there’s now a lot less reason for someone to like your Page–because they can comment without clicking like. As Seth’s conversation with Webster University’s Patrick Powers points out around the 42:50 mark, control of that process is shifting further away from the Page (although it may not really matter very much, because if someone wanted to snark you, they just clicked “like” to gain the privilege anyhow).

3) It’s not only about the “like.” New social actions will allow people to “read,” “listen,” “watch,” and more. Why not get creative with it?

4) You can find new ways to spread your content. As Mike Schaffer points out, the cover photo offers the chance to ask people to use your branded image on their profiles without changing their profile images; Timeline entries mean you can ask someone to add an encounter with your brand to their personal history; and Life Events mean that people can include your brand in their milestones–which are expanding from things like relationship status to include “bought a house,” “got a dog,” and more. (You can find icons with drop-down menus near the status update box on Timeline.)


*If you like people who have ideas and talk about them, you ought to be watching Higher Ed Live. And remember Seth Odell’s name. You’re going to keep hearing from him, and he’s worth listening to.

Go to Top